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Tobacco

  • . Clements served in the U.S. House of Representatives, 1945-1947; governor of Kentucky, 1947-1950; and as U.S. Senator from 1950-1956 (Acting Majority Leader 1955-1956). This primary source material consists of personal, political, and legal papers, as well as political cartoons, photographs, audio-visual material, and memorabilia. Clements dealt with tobacco issues while serving as a representative and senator, and also as governor. After serving as Kentucky Highway Commissioner from 1959-1960, he returned to Washington, D.C. as a maritime lobbyist, and later, as an executive with the American Tobacco Institute. See also the Earle C. Clements Oral History Project in the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History in the University of Kentucky Libraries.
  • . Cooper served in the Kentucky General Assembly (1927-1929); Pulaski County Judge, (1930-1938); U.S. Senate (1946-1948, 1952-1954, and 1956-1972); U.S. Ambassador to India and Nepal (1955-1956); and first U.S. Ambassador to East Germany (1974-1976). This primary source material consists of correspondence, newspaper clippings, reports, printed material, county government documents, photographs, scrapbooks, audio-visual material, and memorabilia. In the Senate, Cooper was an advocate for price supports for tobacco growers. See also the John Sherman Cooper Oral History Project located in the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History at the University of Kentucky Libraries.

  • Walter D. Huddleston Collection, 1926-1985. Huddleston, a Democrat, served in the Kentucky State Senate (1965-1972) and the U.S. Senate (1972-1984). He won broad bipartisan respect from both political parties and built his reputation for effectiveness through quiet, hard work, preferring efforts in committee and personal interaction and persuasion to grandstanding. Republican Majority Leader Howard Baker described Huddleston as one of the Senate's ten most effective members. He was a champion of the tobacco price support system that was so important to Kentucky's economy, combining his personal influence in the Senate with his senior status on the Agriculture and Appropriation Committees to shepherd legislation placing the burley tobacco program on a self-sustaining basis. In his first term, he was asked to serve on the Church Committee that investigated intelligence activities and led to the formation of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence and the creation of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) Court. During that period, he authored legislation giving Congress statutory oversight authority of the nation's intelligence efforts. He also served as Vice Chair of the Select Committee on Undercover Activities. See also the oral history interviews with Walter D. Huddleston in the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History.
  • . Morton served in the U.S.House of Representatives from1947-1953. He was appointed Assistant Secretary of State in 1953 and served until 1956. In 1957 he was elected to the U.S. Senate and served until 1969. This primary source material consists of correspondence, photographs, political cartoons, and legislative files. Morton was involved with tobacco issues while he was a member of the House of Representatives and U.S. Senate. See also the Thruston B. Morton Oral History Project located in the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History at the University of Kentucky Libraries.
  • The Kentucky Family Farm Oral History Project. This collection of over 550 interviews contain many with tobacco growers, suppliers, and manufacturers. This project is located in the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History at the University of Kentucky Libraries.

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