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Civil Rights and Public Policy

  • . Chandler was twice governor of Kentucky, 1935-1939, and 1955-1959; a U.S. Senator, 1939-1945; Commissioner of Major League Baseball, 1945-1951. This primary source material (Accession #77M1) consists of personal, political, and general papers, legal papers, and a subject file. There are also photographs, political cartoons, audio-visual material, and memorabilia in this collection. During his term as Commissioner of Baseball, Jackie Robinson became the first African-American player allowed to play in the major leagues. See also the 1946 Report of the Major League Steering Committee regarding the integration of baseball. During his second term as governor of Kentucky, Chandler sent National Guard troops to Sturgis, Kentucky to enforce the integration of the schools. See also the A.B. "Happy" Chandler Oral History Project in the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History in the University of Kentucky Libraries.
  • . Clements served in the U.S. House of Representatives, 1945-1947; governor of Kentucky, 1947-1950; and as U.S. Senator from 1950-1956 (Acting Majority Leader 1955-1956). This primary source material (Accession #76M2, #82M6, #84M2, and #2007MS065) consists of personal, political, and legal papers, as well as political cartoons, photographs, audio-visual material, and memorabilia. During Clements' term as governor, the University of Kentucky was forced to admit its first African American student, Lyman T. Johnson, in 1948. Clements was an advocate of civil rights but was not able to make much progress in desegregating the rest of Kentucky's colleges and professional schools. See also the Earle C. Clements Oral History Project in the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History in the University of Kentucky Libraries.
  • . Combs was governor of Kentucky (1959-1963) and a judge on the U.S. Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals (1967-1970). This primary source material (Accession #96M7) consists of correspondence, newspaper clippings, photographs, audio-visual material, and memorabilia. Combs appointed the state's first human rights commission, and issued an executive order that desegregated all public accommodations in Kentucky. See also the interviews with Bert T. Combs in the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History in the University of Kentucky Libraries, and the interviews with Combs and others located at the Eastern Kentucky University Archives.
  • . Cooper served in the Kentucky General Assembly (1927-1929); Pulaski County Judge, (1930-1938); U.S. Senate (1946-1948, 1952-1954, and 1956-1972); U.S. Ambassador to India and Nepal (1955-1956); and first U.S. Ambassador to East Germany (1974-1976). This primary source material (Accession #80M1) consists of correspondence, newspaper clippings, reports, printed material, county government documents, photographs, scrapbooks, audio-visual material, and memorabilia. Although a Republican, Cooper supported liberal causes such as civil rights as early as 1957 and 1964 while in the U.S. Senate. See also the John Sherman Cooper Oral History Project in the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History in the University of Kentucky Libraries.
  • . Hager became publisher and editor of the Owensboro Inquirer (later the Messenger-Inquirer) in 1919, and over the next 70 years education, health, transportation, politics, charity and civic groups were influenced by Hager and the newspaper he headed. This primary source material (Accession #97MS501) consists of correspondence, reports, newspaper clippings, statistics, photographs, and family genealogical material. This collection contains material regarding the last public execution, that of Rainey Bethea, an African American, that occurred in 1936 in Owensboro, Kentucky, and sparked national controversy.
  • Victor Howard Civil Rights Collection. Dr. Howard, a professor at Morehead State University, gathered over 2,500 items pertaining to the civil rights movement from 1932 to 1972. This material (Accession #2009MS014) consists of reports, pro and anti-segregation literature, articles, books, journals and periodicals, newsletters, and government documents. Dr. Howard was particularly interested in the effect the civil rights movement had on education, and this is reflected by the large amount of literature in the collection dedicated to this issue. This collection is available in Special Collections at the University of Kentucky Libraries.
  • . Reed was Solicitor General of the U.S. from 1935-1938, and an Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court from 1938-1957. This primary source material consists of correspondence, memo files, docket books, opinion files, a special master file, published cases, photographs, and memorabilia. He was on the Court during the Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas decision in 1954. See also the Stanley F. Reed Oral History Project in the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History in the University of Kentucky Libraries.
  • . Vinson served in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1925-1929, and again from 1931-1938. He was appointed Secretary of the Treasury in 1945 and served until 1946 when he was appointed Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. This primary source material consists of correspondence, photographs, court decisions, agency reports, government documents, press releases, statistics, executive orders, and memorabilia. He served until 1953. Vinson was Chief Justice during the Sweatt v. Painter decision in 1950. See also the Fred M. Vinson Oral History Project in the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History in the University of Kentucky Libraries.
  • Blacks in Lexington Oral History Project. This collection of over 250 interviews concern educational, political, economic and social opportunities for African Americans in Lexington, Kentucky during the twentieth century. This collection is located in the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History in the University of Kentucky Libraries.
  • Blacks in Louisville Oral History Project. This collection of 30 interviews helps to document the African American experience in twentieth century Kentucky. This collection is located in the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History in the University of Kentucky Libraries.
  • Blacks in Kentucky Oral History Project. The 18 interviews in the collection help to document the African American experience in Kentucky during the twentieth century. These interviews are located in the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History in the University of Kentucky Libraries.
  • Anne Braden Oral History Project. The 24 interviews in this project document the work and relationships of Louisville social activist Anne Braden. These interviews are located in the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History in the University of Kentucky Libraries. See also the in the Manuscripts Archive.
  • Edward T. Breathitt Oral History Project. These are 12 life-history interviews with former Kentucky Governor Edward T. Breathitt. In these interviews, Gov. Breathitt discusses his role in getting the Kentucky Civil Rights Bill passed in 1964 and meeting Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. This project is located in the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History in the University of Kentucky Libraries.
  • The Daily Aesthetic: An Oral History of a Southern City's Black Park System, 1916-1956. These seven interviews discuss the history of the black park system in Lexington, Kentucky. They are located in the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History in the University of Kentucky Libraries.
  • The Robert Penn Warren Civil Rights Oral History Project. These 38 interviews were conducted by author Robert Penn Warren in 1964 for his book, Who Speaks for the Negro, which was published in 1965. Warren interviewed such luminaries as Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, Stokely Carmichael, James Baldwin, James Farmer, and James Forman to name a few. These interviews are located in the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History at the University of Kentucky Libraries.
  • Col. Arthur L. Kelly American Veterans Oral History Project: Veterans of World War Two. This collection of over 350 interviews contains several interviews with African American marines, sailors, and soldiers who describe conditions and the treatment they had to endure during World War Two. These interviews are located in the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History at the University of Kentucky Libraries.
  • Charles T. Wethington U.K. Alumni/Faculty Oral History Project. This collection of over 700 interviews contains several interviews with Lyman T. Johnson, the first African American admitted to the University of Kentucky, as well as interviews with several men and women who were admitted shortly thereafter. These interviews detail how these people were treated by their classmates and their professors, as well as the formation of the Black Student Union and other civil rights and related social activities. These interviews are located in the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History at the University of Kentucky Libraries.
  • Black Church in Kentucky Oral History Project. The 66 interviews in this project help document the history and importance of historically African American churches throughout Kentucky. These interviews are located in the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History at the University of Kentucky Libraries.
  • Rufus B. Atwood Oral History Project. The twelve interviews in this project document the life and career of Rufus B. Atwood, former president of Kentucky State University, one of only two historically African American universities in Kentucky. Atwood was at KSU during the period of segregation and the civil rights movement. This project is located in the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History at the University of Kentucky Libraries. See also A Black educator in the segregated South : Kentucky's Rufus B. Atwood, by Gerald L. Smith, in the University of Kentucky Libraries and the Rufus B. Atwood Collection, located in the Paul G. Blazer Library at Kentucky State University.
  • History of Owensboro, Kentucky Oral History Project. The 24 interviews in this project help to document the racial, governmental, economic, and civic development of Owensboro in the 20th century. These interviews are located in the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History at the University of Kentucky Libraries.
  • Owensboro-Daviess County, Kentucky Oral History Project: Race Relations, 1930-1970 Project. The ten interviews in this project help to document the history of segregation and civil rights in Owensboro and Daviess County, Kentucky during a major part of the 20th century. These interviews are located in the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History at the University of Kentucky Libraries.
  • Lexington Urban League Oral History Project. The 30 interviews in this project help document the history of the Lexington-Fayette County Urban League. These interviews are located in the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History in the University of Kentucky Libraries.

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